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The Sister Study

Helping future generations of women prevent breast cancer.

Who is Leading the Sister Study?

The Sister Study is conducted by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) exit disclaimer — one of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) exit disclaimer of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).exit disclaimer

Dr. Dale Sandler exit disclaimer

Dr. Dale Sandler is the Principal Investigator of the Sister Study and the co-Principal Investigator of the Two Sister Study. She received her MPH from Yale University School of Medicine in 1975, and her PhD in Epidemiology from The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health in 1979. Dr. Sandler is Chief of the Epidemiology Branch in the Division of Intramural Research at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. She studies environmental causes of chronic disease in adults. Dr. Sandler’s research has looked at risk factors for leukemia and kidney disease, health effects of residential and occupational exposure to radon, and the health consequences of exposure to cigarette smoke and agricultural chemicals. She is co-Principal Investigator of the Agricultural Health Study and Principal Investigator of the GuLF Study, a new cohort study of the health of persons involved in cleaning up following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in April of 2010.

Dr. Clarice Weinberg exit disclaimer

Dr. Clarice Weinberg is the Principal Investigator of the Two Sister Study and a Co-Investigator of the Sister Study. She received her MA in Mathematics in 1974 from Brandeis University, and her PhD in Biomathematics from the University of Washington, Seattle in 1980. Dr. Weinberg is Chief of the Biostatistics Branch in the Division of Intramural Research at NIEHS. Dr. Weinberg is interested in assessing genetic effects and developing better designs and methods of analysis to help understand the joint role of genetics and environmental exposures in causing disease.

Dr. Jack Taylor exit disclaimer

Dr. Jack Taylor is a Co-investigator on both the Sister Study and Two Sister Study. He received his MD from the University of Wisconsin, and his PhD in epidemiology from the University of North Carolina. He did residency training in Radiology at Michigan State University and in Preventive Medicine at the University of North Carolina. Dr. Taylor serves jointly as the Chief of the Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology Section in the Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis and as a Senior Investigator in the Epidemiology Branch at NIEHS. His research is directed at understanding the genetic and epigenetic determinants of environmentally-associated cancers.

Dr. Stephanie London exit disclaimer

Dr. Stephanie London is a senior investigator in the Epidemiology Branch and Laboratory of Respiratory Biology in the Division of Intramural Research at NIEHS and is a Co-investigator of the Sister Study. She received her AB, MD, MPH and DrPH (Epidemiology) from Harvard University. She completed a residence in internal medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. Her doctoral thesis focused on risk factors for breast cancer, but more recently she has focused on genetic and environmental factors, and their interactions, in respiratory and allergic diseases. Before joining NIEHS in 1995, Dr. London was on the faculty at the University of Southern California School of Medicine.

Dr. Paula Scarborough Juras exit disclaimer

Dr. Paula Scarborough Juras is the NIEHS Project Officer for the Sister Study and the Two Sister Study, providing scientific and operational leadership for both. She earned a BA in Chemistry from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a PhD in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from the University of Florida. Her research centered on an indicator of breast cancer prognosis, and contributed to the development of protease inhibitor therapeutics for persons living with HIV. Following a research associateship with Duke University Medical Center, Dr. Juras accepted a research fellowship with the NIEHS, where she studied lung disorders associated with some breast cancer treatments. She joined the Epidemiology Branch in the NIEHS Division of Intramural Research as a Specialist in 1999.


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